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My Nuffield Blood Test Results

Paul Private Blood Test Nuffield Results

I’ve got to say that I’m pretty pleased about these results – you may remember at the end of my last post I was expecting High cholesterol, glucose and TSH, as well as low levels of Vitamin D.

Glucose/HbA1c

Given that I forgot to fast (you should ideally fast for 12 hours) I’m thankful that this test, the Comprehensive plus V with HbA1c has, as it’s name suggests HbA1C as an inclusion instead of glucose. This measures glycated haemoglobin levels, which is a good measure of average blood glucose over teh preceeding 8-12 weeks. So all good there then.

High Cholesterol

My entire family has high cholesterol levels, and I have had high cholesterol readings before so i’m not really surprised at finding out that I have high levels of total, LDL (bad) cholesterol as well as high triglycerides. The triglyceride level is to be fair probably affected by my no fasting state. Let’s see what the Blue Horizon Duty Doctor has to say….

“The total cholesterol level of 6.4 is higher than recommended by most authorities, and the LDL (the component of cholesterol that is associated with development of cardiovascular disease) is high at 3.8 – most authorities prefer it to be below 2.5.  The ratio formed by dividing cholesterol by HDL is probably the better guide to primary risk from cholesterol (i.e. the risk from cholesterol alone, if there is no established heart disease, high blood pressure or diabetes for example) – at 5.7 it is just higher than the ideal score of 5 or lower, which implies your risk of developing heart disease from cholesterol induced damage alone may be higher than the headline total suggests. Your absolute risk of developing heart and vascular disease is dependent on a number of factors however, including weight, blood pressure, whether you smoke or are diabetic or not, and family history.

The triglyceride level of 3.1 is high. A higher triglyceride level is associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis, and possibly with heart disease and stroke. Sometimes high triglycerides are a sign of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, low levels of thyroid hormones, liver or kidney disease, or rare genetic conditions that affect how your body converts fat to energy. High triglycerides could also be a side effect of taking medications such as beta blockers, diuretics and steroids.”

Vitamin D

My Vitamin D levels are a little low. Not as low as they had been last year.

My level is 48.48 nmol/L

Deficient is considered under 25 nmol/L

Insufficient is considered 25-50 nmol/L

Ideal is 50 – 200 nmol/L, and dosage of Vitamin D containing supplements is advised if levels are over 200 nmol/L.

The ranges given by Nuffield are broadly in alignment with the rest of the UK laboratory ranges – some USA based book writers will advise of much higher levels needed for Vitamin D – I’m not sure if it is right or not, but they sure sell a lot of books!

Blue Horizon Duty Doctor – “There is Vitamin D insufficiency. Vitamin D is manufactured in our skin as a direct result of sunlight exposure. One potential complication of prolonged Vitamin D lack is osteomalacia, a disease which causes severe structural deformities to the skeleton. Lower level Vitamin D deficiency can lead to a number of non specific symptoms, including possibly chronic fatigue (experts have for many years noted an association between sufferers of chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalitis (CFS or ME) and low blood levels of Vitamin D).

It has been estimated that between 50-70% of people living in the northern Europe (where daylight length reduces your chances of receiving adequate sunlight in the winter) are deficient in this vitamin by March each year. Symptoms of vitamin D deficiency include chronic pain, weak bones, frequent infections (recent research has detected an association between vitamin D deficiency and severe pneumonia), depression and fatigue. Supplementation may be beneficial – please speak to your usual doctor about this result.”

Conclusion.

Not a bad set of results overall, but given my family history of heart disease I could do with getting some more regular exercise and watching my diet a bit better. I’m the wrong side of 40, and having spent the first 40 years of my life trying to kill myself I need to spend the next 40 trying to stay alive!

You can get your own Comprehensive plus V at Nuffield, Spire, or in London.

How i’m getting some exercise AND raising money for charity, and how YOU can help!

About Paul Harris

Entreprenurse founder of Blue Horizon Medicals, Editor of Bloodtests.uk - aiming to get private blood test access to 1 billion people wordwide by 2020, and 6 billion by 2025.

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